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I Hate PE Class!

Find out how to make phys ed class a lot more fun.
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By Katrina Brown Hunt
WebMD Feature

Bored tweens in PE classThink you're the only kid who hates PE class? You're not. Everybody has something they think they're not good at. Maybe you think you can't run fast or can't get a ball through the hoop. Some kids worry about dropping a ball during a game and making everybody else mad, or getting laughed at -- or both.

Here are some things you can do to make PE class better -- or at least seem shorter.

Think you’re not good enough? Practice.

"You look at the kids with skills, and you may think they're lucky," says phys ed teacher George Graham. "But they're not -- they've just done it more."  So if your class is playing softball, ask a friend or family member to help you practice swinging a bat after school. Keep in mind, too, that kids may think you're lucky in other ways -- like how quickly you "get" math or how well you write.

Worried about what you'll have to do in PE class? Talk to your teacher.

Find out what's going on in your next PE class, and see how you can get ready. If it's basketball, shoot some hoops on the playground before you have to do it in class so you'll feel more confident. You can also ask your PE teacher to give you a break if you struggle with a specific skill, like climbing a rope or doing pull-ups. Just tell her that you're worried about your classmates teasing you when you already know you have problems with that skill. Your teachers may help you find a creative solution.

Think you can't keep up with everyone else? Set your own goals.

A lot of top athletes don't think about competing with other athletes. They compete against themselves and are always looking to beat their "personal best." Maybe you won't run the fastest mile, but you can run farther or faster than you did last time. "Think to yourself, 'Am I being the best I can be?'" says Jenna Johnson, an exercise physiologist at Sanford Health in North Dakota. When you set a new personal best, that's always something to be proud of.